DELIVERING INNOVATION

Meet Daniel, Associate Project Engineer in Spine Product Development. During his time at Penn State University, Daniel joined our co-op program, looking to learn how medical devices are developed. He gained much more than he initially thought when he decided to pursue a career in the field and joined us full-time following graduation. Read the full interview below.

Where did you go to school and what was your field of study?
I started my college career at Penn State University studying biomechanical engineering with the intent to go to medical school and become a surgeon. After my co-op experience with Globus, I switched to mechanical engineering with the hopes of working for the company post-graduation.

What did you find interesting about Globus that made you pursue the co-op position?
The wide variety of products that Globus offers and the close relationships Globus has with surgeons. The opportunity to have discussions with surgeons about their practice, techniques, and procedures and how this influences product design was too good of an opportunity to pass up.

What did you expect to gain from the experience?
My top priority was to see how products are designed from the ground up as a solution to clinical problems. I wanted to learn how medical devices are manufactured and produced, both with regard to prototype and production parts. I also wanted to learn how development teams interact with healthcare professionals to design their products.

What was the most valuable thing you learned during your co-op experience?
To always ask questions. Asking questions helps generate a better understanding of an issue, task, or solution and can benefit all parties involved. The better understanding you have of a goal, the higher the chance for success.

Now that you have joined Globus as a full-time employee, what opportunities are you looking to pursue?
I am looking forward to observing surgical cases to expand my clinical knowledge about the spine market. The more clinical knowledge I can accumulate, the better I will be at addressing clinical issues from a development standpoint. I am excited to work with my team to continuously improve our products for doctors and their patients.

What would you recommend future co-ops take advantage of while at Globus in the hopes of landing a job post-graduation?
I would recommend taking full advantage of others’ experience to help build a better understanding of your goals. Always ask questions and work closely with the team to take in all the information you can. I have worked with many individuals with immense talent and experience who were always willing to help and answer my many questions.

Meet Adam, Associate Project Engineer in Imaging, Navigation, and Robotics Product Development. Adam joined our co-op program looking to be part of the product development engine that drives Globus’ innovation. Read the full interview below.

Where did you go to school and what was your field of study?
I went to Drexel University on a 5-year program where I earned my BS in mechanical engineering.

What did you find interesting about Globus that made you pursue the co-op position?
Drexel gives you the opportunity to hold three 6-month co-op positions. My co-op goal was to try as many different things as possible to get a good idea of what I wanted (or didn’t want) to pursue in a career. My previous two co-ops had been in construction management and industrial engineering and manufacturing, so medical device engineering seemed like the next best step to diversify my experience. What kept me interested was the emphasis Globus puts on innovation and product design. Product development is the engine that drives Globus, and I wanted to be a part of that.

What did you expect to gain from the experience?
Being from a purely mechanical background, my two main goals were to learn about the scope of engineering in the medical device industry and to figure out how to leverage my own background to succeed.

What was the most valuable thing you learned during your co-op experience?
The most important thing I learned was not to be afraid to immerse myself. The projects I was exposed to working with the ExcelsiusGPS® robotic platform were incredibly diverse, each with its own daunting challenges. What I found was that once you take that first step, it gets much easier to push forward and learn more. The unique perspectives that you gain from working on these projects and their respective markets are critical in developing products that are as competitive as possible.

Now that you have joined Globus as a full-time employee, what opportunities are you looking to pursue?
I look forward to observing my first ExcelsiusGPS® case and seeing our products in action!

What would you recommend future co-ops take advantage of while at Globus in hopes of landing a job post-graduation?
Take advantage of the labs and the product room! Getting your hands on our products is the best way to learn about them and gain direction in your work.

Meet Phillip, Field Service Engineer in Product Development. He has a passion for engineering and is excited for the future! Read the full interview below.

As a kid, what did you want to be when you grew up, and when did you realize you wanted to become an engineer?
During middle and high school, I enjoyed math and science, so majoring in engineering as an undergrad was a natural choice. I went into a biomedical engineering program intending to work on prosthetics or brain stimulators, but after graduating, I found an opportunity as a sales rep in the spine industry. A few years later, I transitioned to my current engineering role so that I could play a part in product design and help improve the systems our surgeons use to treat patients.

What has been one of your favorite projects to work on?
Two projects come to mind.

The first is a personal concept I have worked on with a few other members of the team that rethinks the way we look at certain approaches to the spine. What has been exciting about that project is the freedom to be really creative with new ideas and designs, exploring and discussing them, and then actually testing them out for feasibility in internal labs.

The second is an active development project. The real reward with this has been the surgeons I have gotten to work with. Everyone is passionate about the project and you can really feel the energy during group discussions. It is a bit humbling knowing that the surgeons trust me with developing the solutions that they will use in the OR to help their patients.

Where do you see engineering in medical devices headed?
Engineering in spine is at an interesting point with the emergence of navigation and robotics. In a way, we are actively undergoing a paradigm shift in how surgeons can do spine surgery, and what product design teams can do using real-time 3D imaging/navigation and robotic trajectory guidance. Because the technologies are still new, they are evolving quickly. Likewise, the vision of what we are able to design to work in tandem with these new tools is evolving. I think we will see a lot of novel and creative uses for navigation and robotics in the coming years, as well as a shift towards software-based solutions to surgical problems rather than traditional mechanical solutions.

What advice do you have for someone considering entering the field of engineering?
I am far from the most experienced engineer at this company—I work with a ton of absolutely incredible engineers who would likely have better advice to give. But one thing I’ve noticed is that engineering is an artistic expression. The amount of creativity that goes into a solution is hard to express. You will have to pull inspiration from existing sources all around you, as well as collaborate with other people to get fresh ideas. You also have to be humble and willing to let go of your own ideas when something better comes up.

Ultimately, engineering is about solving problems that have not been solved before, or solving them better than ever before. Everything you do is pushing the overall body of human knowledge forward one little bit, and locks in that progress in a way that can never be reversed. That is what is encouraging about the work. It’s the constant push to guarantee that today is better than yesterday, and that tomorrow will be better than today.

Meet Brendan, Product Manager in our Spine Product Development. Brendan brings his positive attitude and dedication to delivering innovation to work every day. Read the full interview to hear how his degree in engineering led to success as a Product Manager.

A conversation with Brendan

When did you start with Globus and what do you do here?
I started with Globus in May of 2017. I am a Product Manager on our Lateral Interbody Fusion Team, managing our innovative expandable lateral interbody systems.

Why did you choose to pursue a career as a product manager?
I decided to pursue a career at Globus as a Product Manager because it was an opportunity to utilize my engineering background in more of a business environment. Not only do I provide input throughout the design phase of a project, but I also spend time gaining relevant clinical and market knowledge to drive awareness around our market-leading lateral technology.

What did you do before you joined Globus?
I graduated from the University of Delaware in 2016 with a degree in Biomedical Engineering. Upon graduation I spent a year in the pharmaceutical industry, then transitioned to my position at Globus.

What’s the best thing about your job?
I enjoy the opportunity to see surgeons treat their patients with our innovative technologies. I get to work with many great people across multiple teams, and it is extremely rewarding for everyone when a project we spent a year working on is launched to market and used to improve the life of a patient.

If you had an unexpected day off tomorrow, what would you do with your free day?
If it was July I would say either go golfing or to the beach. Since it is the winter I would most likely take my dog to the dog park, and spend the rest of the day watching the Office (again) or whatever Philly sports game is on TV.


Meet Brittany Meade, a Senior Clinical Sales Representative with our Imaging, Navigation and Robotics team. Brittany is passionate about her role in delivering Globus’ innovation to our customers and being part of a team dedicated to improving patients’ lives.

A conversation with Brittany

How did you get started in sales? What interested you most in being part of the Globus team?
My career in sales began in 2016 as a Senior Clinical Specialist with Medtronic Spine, Biologics and Stealth. Before I entered sales, I worked as a Certified Surgical Technologist on spine and orthopaedic teams which quickly became a passion of mine. I decided to join the INR team at Globus after learning about the culture. The INR team, especially the clinical team, is a family and that is something I truly value.

What is your favorite part of your job?
My favorite part of my job is the daily interactions I have with people from all over the world. I’m able to teach and showcase the amazing medical technology of ExcelsiusGPS® that is changing the way spine surgery is performed.

As part of the Imaging, Navigation and Robotics team, you are involved with the innovation that Globus delivers. What sets us apart from the competition?
Besides the way ExcelsiusGPS® navigates, it’s the service our team provides. Everyone on this team is extremely passionate about what we do and the product we are delivering. Long days and nights, weekends, and time spent away from our families are something we do because we know we have an incredible product that can change lives.

What advice would you give to someone interested in starting a career in sales or in joining Globus?
Medical device sales are far more than collecting a paycheck. It’s about bettering the lives of the patient that these devices are used on. From a nursing home, to labor and delivery, to the operating room assisting with surgery, one thing has remained the same and that’s the value I place on patient outcomes.

How do you like to spend your free time?
I am a huge foodie. Cooking, eating, watching cooking shows, searching Pinterest for the best new restaurants all lead to my love of travel. I have a rescue pup at home that I love to take for walks and hikes with my boyfriend.